+800-451-7111 For USA and Canadian Guests

   506-2761-1800 For Costa Rican Guests

   +352-377-7111 Outside Costa Rica, USA / Canada

 

flogoylogo

+800-451-7111 For USA and Canadian Guests
+506-2761-1800 For Costa Rican Guests
+352-377-7111 Outside Costa Rica, USA and Canada

flogo

youtube logo

ABOUT

Selva Verde Lodge Blog

Clay Taylor 1Clay Taylor, Leader and Naturalist Market Manager for Swarovski Optik Make your reservation to see spectacular avian diversity, and then leave your binoculars and spotting scope at home. Sound crazy? Not when Eagle Optics and Swarovski Optik team up to offer you an amazing bird trip and outfit you with top-notch Swarovski binoculars. Costa Rica is famous among birdwatchers; this small country encompasses only 0.03% of the earth’s surface, yet provides sanctuary for nearly 900 species of birds or 5% of the world’s biodiversity.

Join Swarovski, Eagle Optics, and an expert Costa Rican guide to see tropical birds like you have never seen them before. With a limited number of spaces available, you should make your reservation now. Once the trip is over and you are convinced you can never go birding again without Swarovski Optiks, you have the opportunity to purchase the Swarovski binoculars at a discounted price. Sign up now for a Swarovski birding experience you’ll never forget!

Read more

Herp1SARAPIQUÍ, COSTA RICA - The III Amphibian and Reptiles Conservation International Symposium and Field Exploration was recently held at Selva Verde Lodge & Rainforest Reserve amidst primary forest in the Caribbean lowlands of Costa Rica. The symposium featured presentations and workshops, conservation and herpetological organizations and individuals.

 

Read more

5 Logo oficial simposio1 225x300Official Logo

Experience four days and three nights in Costa Rica—home to 5% of the world’s biodiversity—trip to one of the herpetology hot spots of Central America. The III Amphibian and Reptiles Conservation International Symposium and Field Exploration (first called The Costa Rican International Herpetological Symposium) will be held September 22-25, 2016, at Selva Verde Lodge & Rainforest Reserve in Sarapiquí, located amidst primary forest in the Caribbean lowlands of Costa Rica. Though small in geographic area, Costa Rica has one of the highest densities of herpetofauna in the world with more than 440 species of reptiles and amphibians.

The  symposium  will  feature  presentations  and  workshops  about  conservation  and  herpetology  by organizations  and  individuals. Come  and  learn  about  new  findings  and  research  from  all over  the Americas  and  beyond, or  see  how  you  can  share  your  own  work  with  conference  participants.

Read more

10 white crowned parrotWhite-crowned Parrot

The white-crowned parrot is a small, perky and robust bird with a disproportionately large head.  It is common and widely-distributed in Costa Rica, most often encountered in semi-open agricultural areas with scattered patchy trees. The species is abundant in the Selva Verde vicinity where it is characteristically most active in the early morning and late afternoon.

These parrots are almost entirely arboreal. They virtually never forage on the ground. Their main diet comprises the seeds, nuts and fruit of palms, Inga and Erythrina, sometimes damaging orchard fruit or corn.

White-crowned parrots are extremely social birds, spending most of their time in flocks with 30-50 members. Each flock is a highly-organized social unit, lacking any specific flock leader, but having a complicated structure shaped by the necessity to detect and avoid predators.

Read more

selvaverde small 08Robert Alison photo

The collared aracari is a small awkward-looking toucan with a prominent enormously-oversized bill. It is fairly common throughout its 500,000 square mile Latin American range, and frequently seen at Selva Verde Lodge, where groups of aracaris often visit bird feeders and forage in local fruiting trees.

All 35 members of the toucan family occur exclusively in the New World tropics. There are 14 species of aracaris, all with slender bodies, richly-colored plumage and banana-shaped hollow bills. None of them are usually found far from forested areas, and most are generally encountered in groups of 6-16 individuals.

Collared aracaris seem to do everything in groups; foraging, loafing and even sleeping together. These birds are among the 16 species of Neotropical birds that have elaborate kinship behavior that includes cooperative care of offspring by non-parents. Research in Costa Rica

Read more

2 red lored parrot r alison 278x299Red-Lored Parrot

Sonographic analysis shows that many local vocal dialects occur within the total range of the species. These dialects are distinct and reflect the general reluctance of these parrots to venture far away from their home areas; consequently geographic vocal variance occurs within subgroups. The vocalizations are innate, but parrots that do venture into new areas rapidly learn the dialects they encounter and thereby avoid being shunned as outsiders.

Red-lored amazons (Amazona autumnalis) are about 14 inches long; the striking plumage is mainly green with red speculum, forehead and lores.

These are vigilant birds, and often quite nervous, spooking noisily at the approach of human or other intruders. But, in the Selva Verde area, most are quite approachable–except in the vicinity of nests. Recent studies confirm that one of the most critical factors contributing to the breeding success of this species is its overall shyness and wary aloofness, and in particular, its inconspicuousness around the nest site. Such behavior minimizes the chances that a nest will be discovered, and potentially destroyed by predators.

Read more

14 keel billed toucan 2 r alison 300x201Keel-Billed Toucan

The keel-billed toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus) is a spectacular species with a preposterously over-sized bill, and one of the most recognized of all neotropical birds. Measuring 20-25 inches in body length, it is one of the larger toucans.
 

Its rainbow-colored banana-shaped bill is its main distinguishing feature. The structure is actually hollow and comparatively weightless, its keratin skin shaped by slivers of bone. Despite its large size, the bill is used with great dexterity, to toss food items into the air; the head is then flipped upward so the food falls into the mouth. The main diet comprises fruit, the seeds of which are excreted whole; consequently, this toucan is an important disperser of forest seeds.

Read more

Shining Honeycreeper 00Shining Honeycreeper

The shining honeycreeper (Cyanerpes lucidus) is one of two similar and strikingly-colored honeycreepers common in upper level forests and semi-open areas of Costa Rica. The bright yellow legs and feet of the shining honeycreeper are a primary distinguishing feature. At Selva Verde, it is most often encountered in pairs or small family groups.  Although its prominent curved beak is specialized for nectar feeding, its main diet comprises succulent fruit.

 

The call is an unimpressive series of sharp staccato chitters, often intermixed with high thin peets.  Researchers confirm this species illustrates the general rule that birds with elaborate colorful plumage often have inferior vocal endowments.

After pair formation, males of this species use song to stimulate females and to maintain the pair-bond. Often, song is used by both adults simultaneously, in duet fashion. Tests show that in this species, there is much individual variation in vocal components and local song dialects occur. The high degree of individuality in song is important for pair members attempting to maintain contact in thick cover.

Read more

11 costaricafeb08 131 300x201Blue-Gray Tanager

The blue-gray tanager (Thraupis episcopus) is one of about 230 species of tropical and subtropical tanagers, and one of the most common and unmistakable birds in Costa Rica. It is a generalist frugavore (fruit-eater), found in a great variety of different habitats, most often in pairs.

It is plentiful and highly visible at Selva Verde, where it regularly frequents bird-feeding trays. Its primary diet comprises succulent fruit from trees, shrubs and vines. Recent studies confirm it has remarkable discriminatory capabilities and can detect 0.09 percent protein variations in food.

These tanagers are restless, always on the move. Their call is a raspy squeaky twittering. In flight, they are easy to distinguish because they seem to bounce through the air, alternatively flapping their wings, then gliding with the wings tucked close to the body.

Read more

ara ambiguaGreat Green Macaw

The great green macaw is arguably the most spectacular bird at Selva Verde. At almost 32 inches in total length and weighing close to three pounds, it is the 2nd-largest New World parrot. It is easily recognized by its robust body and long tail. It has an extraordinarily powerful bill and dexterous toes that grasp food items that are being eaten.

 Unfortunately, despite its iconic status, the future of the great green macaw in Costa Rica is precarious. In 2006, it was listed as endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and since then its numbers have continued to decline. At present, it is believed there are no more than 200 in Costa Rica; the breeding population is roughly 35 pairs. Selva Verde is on the edge of the range of the last remaining population in Costa Rica; none of the approximately 20 known active nests are in the Sarapiquí zone, where Selva Verde is located.

Read more